Helmut Newton Exhibition

The photographs selected by Newton himself and publicised in his first three books have become legendary. They have been brought back together in an exhibition that hosts the works donated by Newton to the Preussischer Kulturbesitz Berlin

When: Until 21 July 2013

Where: Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Via Nazionale, 194

Info: +39 0639967500 http://www.palazzoesposizioni.it/Home.aspx

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  • Tiziano Exhibition in Rome 2013

    Do not miss the exhibition of the Maestro Tiziano in Rome!

    When: From 5 March to 16 June 2013

    Where: Scuderie del Quirinale, Via XXIV Maggio, 16

    Info: +39 0639967500   http://www.scuderiequirinale.it/Home.aspx

    The Concert and La Bella from Palazzo Pitti, Flora from the Uffizi, the Gozzi Altarpiece from Ancona, Danaë and the Shower of Gold from Capodimonte, Charles V with a Dog and the Self-portrait from the Prado, or the Flaying of Marsyas from Kromeriz are some of the most celebrated works of the great Venetian painter Titian (Pieve di Cadore, circa 1485 - Venice, 1576).  These and many more are to go on display at the Quirinale in an exhibition designed to stand as the ideal conclusion to the sweeping overview of Venetian painting and the debate on the crucial role that it played in the renewal of culture in Italy and in Europe, promoted by the Scuderie del Quirinale in an analysis of the work of the leading players in the modern revolution in painting, from Antonello da Messina to Giovanni Bellini, Lorenzo Lotto and Tintoretto, of which Titian is the last and loftiest witness in his role as the European artist par excellence.

    Visitors to the exhibition will be able to retrace the salient moments of this great Italian painter's uncontainable rise, from his early days in the workshops of Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione in Venice to the independence that he won with his large canvases for the Doges and for the D'Este and Della Rovere families, and ultimately with his imperial commissions from Charles V and his son Philip II.  Titian's entire artistic career will be represented at the highest level, decade by decade, underscoring his masterly sense of colour and the development of his brushwork, which proved capable of surpassing the boundaries of painterly imagination. Through iconographic comparisons - particularly emblematic, among the many that the exhibition will be hosting, is a comparison between the Crucifixion from the Dominican church in Ancona, the Crucifixion for the Escorial in Madrid, and the fragmentary Crucifixion now in the Pinacoteca Nazionale in Bologna - visitors will be able to gain a direct perception of the master's innovative approach and compositional structure, in an exhibition designed to convey not only his crucial role as a religious painter but also his complex career as portrait-painter extraordinary to the nobility and aristocracy of his day.  Thanks to the support of, and loans from, many leading museums both in Italy and overseas, the exhibition sets out to permit a broader audience to grasp the exceptional nature of an artist who was capable of merging "the greatness and the power of Michel Agnolo, the sweetness and the beauty of Raphael and the very colours of Nature herself", as Ludovico Dolce, a contemporary writer and fervent admirer of the master, so aptly put it.

    The exhibition will be accompanied by the results of an extensive campaign of scientific analysis which has encompassed a large part of the artist's output.  Conducted by the Centro di Ateneo di Arti Visive at the Università degli Studi di Bergamo, the campaign has achieved results of the utmost importance in defining the relationship between autograph works and workshop products, and in fully documenting Titian's technical development from the earliest days of his apprenticeship.


    Source: http://english.scuderiequirinale.it/categorie/exhibition-tiziano-rome

  • Dining with a spectacular view of Rome!!

    Cruise on the Tiber River with Dinner

    Romantic Dinner in Rome

    Experience Rome with a magical evening in an exclusive environment - see the eternal city from the water while enjoying outstanding Italian cuisine!

    Boarding Point: Sant'Angelo Pier (opposite Sant’Angelo Castle, on the left bank)
    Cruise Duration: 2 hours and 15 minutes approximately
    Departure Time: 9:00pm (customers are required to arrive 15 minutes before the departure)
    Reservation: Booking required
    Available Dates & Times: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from April 1 to October 31

    The Tiber Cruise Service includes:

    • Appetizer
    • First course
    • Main course with vegetable side dish
    • Dessert
    • Mineral water (0.5 liter)
    • Coffee
    • Background music

    Please Note:

    • Wine and soft drinks are not included in the basic price.
    • The menu is fixed, and changes every two weeks. According to catering availability and subject to confirmation at the moment of the reservation, changes can be made for justified reasons, such as allergies.

    Cancellation Policy:
    Individuals: Full refund for cancellations requested until two (2) days before the cruise

    Groups of over 15 people:

    • Full refund for cancellations or changes until 20 days before the cruise
    • 25% of the fee will be charged for cancellations or changes requested from 20 to 5 days before the cruise
    • No refund for cancellations or changes requested less than 5 days advance of the cruise date

    PLEASE NOTE: Immediately after submitting an order, you will receive an email with your order summary plus a second email confirming your successful payment. A confirmation email with links to the vouchers will be sent one business day after you place your order (Monday afternoon for orders submitted on Friday and during the weekend).

    Sources and Copyrights:   http://en.roma.waf.it/tour_dett/233-boat-tours/2128-cruise-on-the-tiber-river-with-dinner.html

  • The Wonderful thermal baths of Caracalla…

    Caracalla

    Wonderful Terms of Caracalla

  • Gnammi Gnammi...Ice Cream!!!

    God's Own Ice Cream

    A gelato crawl to some of the best ice cream parlors in Rome, Italy

    When is really hot, eat always a good Ice - Cream !!

    Although not quite the ice cream mecca Florence is, Rome's gelato is still heavenly.

    Any gelateria (ice cream parlor) that advertises produzione propria (homemade) will have a high-quality, tasty stock, but who has the best gelato in town?

    Well, that's a question fiercely debated by any and all ice cream lovers.

    First, a few ground rules:

    • Don't call it ice cream. First thing to know, to call gelato "ice cream" is insulting to gelato and unfair to ice cream. Gelato is much richer, smoother, and more flavorful than ice cream.

      It is churned, not whipped (as is most traditional American ice cream), so it is far denser, giving it a richer mouth feel. Gelato also is not as laden with sugar and cream, so the subtle tastes of its flavoring comes through much better than in ice cream.
    • Get it at a gelateria: Second thing to know, gelato is something you go out for at a special parlor called a gelateria, and most of it is consumed during the early evening passeggiata stroll—not that gelaterie aren't equally busy during the heat of midday, or late at night...

      I mention this because, unlike in America, gelato is not typically eaten after a meal—or at least you typically don't order it at the restaurant.

      Restaurants often do offer "gelato" on their dessert menus, but this is almost always of the pre-packaged variety. This is fine (I'm partial to a tartufo, a Gobstopper-like sphere of vanilla, chocolate, and fudge dusted with cocoa) but it's not real gelato.

  • Cram in as many flavors as you can think of: Third thing to know, you pay by the size of the coppa (cup) or cono (cone), not by the scoop. That means you can (and are encouraged to) squeeze two or even three flavors into even the smallest cup.

    Italians taught me that even unusual pairs go great together; a personal favorite: cioccolato e limone (chocolate gelato and lemon sorbetto). No, really; try it.

    (Also most Italians order by the cup; the cone is a fun—if messy—American addition to the options, but not too popular).
  • The best gelaterie in Rome

    ★★★ San Crispino - Everyone's favorite "secret gelateria," which is code for "not (yet) crammed with tourists". In point of fact, it's a pretty poorly kept secret, for which we should all be thankful... Full story

    ★★ Caffè Giolitti - Perhaps the most famous gelateria in Rome, going strong since 1900 and still serving the best classic Roman ice cream... Full story

    Tre Scalini - Classy cafe on Piazza Navona serving the classic homemade tartufo, a gelato gobstopper with a cherry in the center... Full story

    The granita cart - On warm, Roman summer nights, the last remaining traditional shave-ice stand in Rome parks on the banks of the Tiber River in Trastevere.... Full story

    Sources and Copyrihts:  http://www.reidsitaly.com/destinations/lazio/rome/dining/gelato.html

  • The World of Caravaggio

    Rome Art Walking Tour: See Caravaggio’s finest works for free

    There is something about Caravaggio that fascinates people. Even those who would normally prefer to cross a street of hot coals than spend time looking at paintings seem happy to make an exception for this rebel of Counter-Renaissance Art.

    To celebrate Rome’s Caravaggio exhibition that has just opened at the Villa Borghese (and runs through January 24, 2010), it seemed timely to look at this bad boy of the paintbrush and take a tour around Rome to see some of his masterpieces for free!

    So just who was Caravaggio?

    Whilst most artists of the Middle Ages were more soft ruffles than tough scuffles, Caravaggio was not afraid of a fight, a drink, and the odd murder to boot. Commission happy, the taste of luxury did not bring out his lighter side. As well as pushing the Catholic church to the edge with his dark religious paintings, he eventually lost his temper once too often. After killing a young man who beat him in a tennis match in the Campo Dei Fiori, he fled Rome with a price on his head. He finally died in exile, never learning that he had been given a Papal Pardon.

    Where can I see Caravaggio for free?

    Sant’ Agostino Church
    Via Sant’ Agostino

    The Madonna di Loreto (painted in 1605, pictured above) is hung in the first chapel on the left. The church is close to Piazza Navona, and also includes a Raphael fresco. The church is currently under restoration, but don’t be fooled. Under the scaffolding, it is still open so you can see the paintings. For those who are pregnant (or wish to be), touch the statue of the “Madonna del Parto” near the door as you leave for luck.

    San Luigi dei Francesi
    Via Giustiniani

    In the church of San Luigi dei Francesi you get three Caravaggio paintings for free with the Matthew trilogy, including  “The Calling of Saint Matthew”, “St. Matthew and the Angels”, and “The Matrydom of Saint Matthew”. This church is close to the centre, a short walk from the Pantheon and Piazza Navona, and next to the French institute with its wonderful bookshop.

    Santa Maria Del Popolo
    Piazza Del Popolo

    This church is about a 20-minute walk from the historic centre, or you can take the Metro Linea A to Flaminio. Here you can find two paintings, the “Conversion of St. Paul” and “The Crucifixion of St. Peter”, so well worth the journey.

    Please note that many churches are closed between 1 PM – 4 PM, but usually stay open in the evening until around 7 PM.

    And if I want to pay?

    Well if you are at the Santa Maria del Popolo, it is just a short walk up the hill to the Galleria Borghese, and its wonderful park. Here you can see three Caravaggio works, “Sick Bacchus”, “Boy with Bag of Fruit” and “Madonna dei Palafrenieri”. Entrance will cost you €8.50 but you also get to see the amazing Bernini sculpture of “Daphne and Apollo” amongst many other treasures.

    At the moment, you can also access the Caravaggio and Bacon exhibition, on through January 24. Note that for the Galleria Borghese, you need to book in advance as only a limited number are allowed in at any one time (more details here).

    Lastly, you can see the “Gypsy Fortune Teller” at the Capitoline Museums, entrance fee €6.50. Don’t forget that both of these museums are included in the Roma Pass, which is a 3-day pass that gives you free access to two museums, free travel on Rome’s public transport, and discounts to other museums and attractions. The pass costs €23. (read more about the Roma Pass).

    About the author: Samantha Collins is a freelance travel writer and editor, who has lived in Rome for the past two years.  She is originally from Manchester in the UK.  Read all about her adventures by visiting her blog,www.samanthacollinsrome.blogspot.com.